Citation

Works Cited Guide

  • When researching anything, you must have a sense of certainty that your information has come from a reliable source and if you do not cite, you are taking credit for someone else's work!
  • The founder of Wikipedia, Jimmy Wales, says, “For God sake... don’t cite the encyclopedia."
  • For a shortcut that is occasionally confusing, just go to http://www.easybib.com

A guide to your works cited page. How to cite...

A Book with One Author

Last name, First Name. Year Published. Title [Italicized]. City of Publication: Publisher.

EXAMPLE:

Highet, Gilbert. 1999. The Classical Tradition: Greek and Roman Influences on Western Literature. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

A Book with an Editor

Last name, First Name of editor ed. Year Published. Title [Italicized]. City of Publication: Publisher.

EXAMPLE:

Scarre, Chris ed. 1995. The Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Rome. New York: Penguin Books.

A Chapter of A Book with an Editor

Last Name, First Name. Year Published. Title [in quotation marks] in Title [Italicized], Last name of editor, Frist Name ed. City of Publication: Publisher.

EXAMPLE:

Goldhill, Simon. 2006. "The Touch of Sappho" in Classics and the Uses of Reception, Martindale, Charles and R. Thomas ed. Oxford:: Blackwell.

A Translation

Last name, First Name or Common Name. Year Published. Title [Italicized]. Translated by Name of Translator (First name Last name). City of Publication: Publisher.

EXAMPLE:

Homer. 2000. The Essential Homer. Translated by S. Lombardo. Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Company.

A Book in More Than One Volume

Last name, First Name. Year Published. Title [Italicized]. Ed. Name of Editor (First name, last). # of volume cited. City of Publication: Publisher.

EXAMPLE:

Gibbon, Edward. 1993. The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. Vol. 1. New York: Alfred A. Knopf.

An Article From a Journal

Last name, First Name. Year Published. “Title.” Name of Journal [Italicized] Volume #.Issue # (if applicable): pages cited.

EXAMPLE:

Dodds, E.R. 1966. “On Misunderstanding the Oedipus Rex.” Greece and Rome 13: 37-49.

An On-line Resource

When citing an on-line resource, give the URL and the date you accessed the page; because of the dynamic nature of web content, the last piece of information is important. If the page is attributed to an author, include that information as well.

EXAMPLES (Note the URLs appear on the a second line to avoid wrapping the link on two lines; it should, however, follow the title on the same line, if it can fit):

Porter, John. "The Iliad as Oral Formulaic Poetry", http://duke.usask.ca/~porterj/CourseNotes/HomOral.html (accessed May 2, 2005).

Dixon, Suzanne. "Roman Women: Following the Clues", http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ancient/romans/roman_women_01.shtml/ (accessed May 2, 2005).

***this guide is from http://www.haverford.edu/classics/courses/omni/citations.php

****parts of this guide are copied and/or developed from "Citing Sources for Classics Courses: A Basic Guide" (http://www.swarthmore.edu/Humanities/classics/Pages/CitationGuidelines.html, accessed May 2, 2006) by the Swarthmore College Department of Classics. Used with Permission.

  © Magistra Kunz 2016